Responsabilit socitale et dveloppement durable

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Projet du Laboratoire de recherche sur le développement durable en contexte de PME, affilié à l’Institut de recherche sur les PME (INRPME) de l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Vigie-PME repère, collecte et rend accessible à tous et en un même endroit les derniers développements scientifiques sur les sujets du développement durable et de la responsabilité sociétale associés à l’entrepreneuriat et à la gestion des petites et moyennes entreprises.

 

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Social Sustainability in Selecting Emerging Economy Suppliers

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Abstract  
Despite the growing public awareness of social sustainability issues, little is known about what drives firms to emphasize social criteria in their supplier management practices and what the precise benefits of such efforts are. This is especially true for relationships with international suppliers from the world’s emerging economies in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Building on stakeholder theory, we address the issue by examining how pressures from customers, the government, and employees as primary constituencies of the firm determine the extent to which firms consider social aspects in the selection of emerging economy suppliers. Further, we analyze how such socially sustainable supplier selection relates to the capabilities of the firm’s suppliers, its market reputation, and the learning in its supply management organization. We test the developed research framework empirically using data from 244 U.S. and German corporations. Our findings, consistent with our hypothesized model, suggest that middle-level supply managers as internal stakeholders play a major driving role for firms’ socially sustainable supplier selection, and that strong positive links exist between that selection and the investigated outcomes.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0537-7
  • Authors
    • Matthias Ehrgott, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Felix Reimann, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Lutz Kaufmann, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Craig R. Carter, Arizona State University Tempe AZ U.S.A.


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:46

Detecting Supply Chain Innovation Potential for Sustainable Development

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Abstract  
In a world of limited resources, it could be argued that companies that aspire to be good corporate citizens need to focus on making best use of resources. User value and environmental harm are created in supply chains and it could therefore be argued that company business ethics should be extended from the company to the entire value chain from the first supplier to the last customer. Starting with a delineation of the linkages between business ethics, corporate sustainability, and the stakeholder concept, this article argues that supply chains generally have a great innovation potential for sustainable development. This potential could be highlighted with system thinking and the use of change management knowledge, promoting not only innovations within technology but also within organizational improvement. We propose process models and performance indicators as means of highlighting improvement potential and thus breaking down normative business ethics’ requirements to an opertionalizable corporate level: Good business ethics should focus on maximizing stakeholder value in relation to harm done. Our results indicate that focusing on supply chains reveals previously unknown innovation potential that seems to be related to limited system understanding. The assumption is that increased visibility of opportunities will act as a driver for change. Results also highlight the importance of focusing on sustainability effects of the core business and clearly relating value created to harm done.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0516-z
  • Authors
    • Raine Isaksson, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden
    • Peter Johansson, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden
    • Klaus Fischer, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:46

Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers’ Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures

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Abstract  
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) refers to the duty of management to consider and respond to issues beyond the organization’s economic and legal requirements in line with social and environmental values. However, ‘management’ is constituted by real people responsible for routine decisions and formulation and implementation of policies. It can be said therefore that the ethical ideals and beliefs of these individuals – in particular their personal values – play an important role in their decisions. It is contended in this article that the personal values of managers may contribute to the creation and maintenance of ‘CSR cultures’ in their organizations; that is, organizational cultures focused on ensuring environmental and social sustainability. Based on an exploratory study carried out in Brazil in 2008, this article explores the perceptions of five CSR managers in relation to the influence of their personal values on their work. The first part discusses the notion of CSR within the context of Brazilian society, the second provides a brief literature review on the link between values and organizational cultures and the third explores the perceptions of the participating managers, identifying the main thematic patterns that emerged in the study.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0470-9
  • Authors
    • Fernanda Duarte, University of Western Sydney School of Management Locked Bag 1797 Penrith South DC NSW 1797 Australia


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:46

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